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Name: Julie A Carda

After studying dance in Europe, Julie returned to the United States and graduated from Creighton University. With a desire to expand her knowledge of the arts and spirituality, she graduated from St. John’s University in Collegeville with a Masters in Theology and Liturgical Studies. Over the past twenty years, she has taught high school and college courses, and facilitated workshops on the healing arts while occasionally writing for academic periodicals. Her quest to acknowledge world religions and the desire to expose the similarities of love and peaceful living, led her to travel, live, and study with shaman practitioners, herbal healers, Native American medicine women, Buddhist priests and other earth-based spiritual teachers. Through these experiences and experiences with global metaphysical teachings, she learned to honor the eternal Source of love in all people. Besides writing fiction, Julie is co-creating a Space of Love through advocacy for Kin Domains.

Thursday, January 14, 2010

Measure the Air Seal

Homeowners are often concerned about sealing their house too tightly; however, this is very unlikely in most older homes. A certain amount of fresh air is needed for good indoor air quality and there are specifications that set the minimum amount of fresh air needed for a house. If you are concerned about how tight your home is, hire a contractor, such as a Home Energy Rater, who can use diagnostic tools to measure your home's actual leakage. If your home is too tight, a fresh air ventilation system may be recommended.

After any home sealing project, have a heating and cooling technician check to make sure that your combustion appliances (gas- or oil-fired furnace, water heater, and dryer) are venting properly. For additional information on Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) issues related to homes, such as combustion safety, visit EPA’s Indoor Air Quality Web site.

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